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Sunday, March 13, 2011

Translucent Gubernatorial Longevity aka Discovering the secrets of really old politicians!

Alright, everyone. Day two of the words. Let's get into it.

First word!

TRANSLUCENT!

trans·lu·cent adj \-sənt\
Definition of TRANSLUCENT

1
: permitting the passage of light:
a : clear, transparent
b : transmitting and diffusing light so that objects beyond cannot be seen clearly
2
: free from disguise or falseness
— trans·lu·cent·ly adverb

Origin of TRANSLUCENT

Latin translucent-, translucens, present participle of translucēre to shine through, from trans- + lucēre to shine — more at light
First Known Use: 1607

1607, Jamestown is established. First town in the United States. Not sure what that has to do with light shining through, but let's just pretend it does.

Jebediah Hobbleward of England proclaimed, "The light of civilization shows through the translucent veil of savagery that is the New World..."

Wow, that sentence is rife with stereotyping, ethnocentrism, and whatever other bad word you can come up with to describe it. That Jebediah fellow was a jerk!

Second word!

LONGEVITY!

lon·gev·i·ty noun \län-ˈje-və-tē, lȯn-\
Definition of LONGEVITY

1
a : a long duration of individual life
b : length of life (a study of longevity)

2 : long continuance : permanence, durability

Origin of LONGEVITY

Late Latin longaevitas, from Latin longaevus long-lived, from longus long + aevum age — more at aye
First Known Use: 1615

Jebediah Hobbleward, being a devoted settler, had begun reciting a poem in 1607 on the glory of the exploration and settlement of the New World. Due to respiratory longevity and a mysterious combination of voodoo, witchcraft, and vampirism, he did not stop reciting that poem until his death in 1615.

Good god.


Third word!

GUBERNATORIAL!

gu·ber·na·to·ri·al adj
\ˌgü-bə(r)-nə-ˈtȯr-ē-əl, ˌgyü-, ˌgu̇-\
Definition of GUBERNATORIAL

: of or relating to a governor

Origin of GUBERNATORIAL

Latin gubernator governor, steersman, from gubernare to govern — more at govern
First Known Use: 1734

The gubernatorial race was extremely contentious in 1734, and the two candidates for governor were both quite popular with the people and expected to garner a large chunk of votes. However, in the end, the winner ended up being the great-grandson of the long forgotten Jebediah Hobbleward.

JEBEDIAH!? Goddamnit, dude, get out of my blog! Where's the number for that exorcist? I mean seriously.

Alright, while I try to remove some weird ghost from my hard drive, you children stay safe. Hopefully you enjoyed the words and the post. Do you have a favorite word that, for some reason, has stuck with you all these years?

Lat- My favorite word, or words rather, are Jebediah and Hobbleward.

AAAAARRRRRRGGGGGGH!!

3 comments:

  1. love the for transulecent. just by reading it i added a shine and glow to my vocabulary!

    ReplyDelete